‘Atypical’ looks pretty typical

Netflix Instant is basically my cable TV, and they emailed me a trailer for their show that’s being added next week, “Atypical.” It has an autistic main character, which immediately gets my interest because I have an autistic child and I’m working on accepting that I’m autistic (which I’ve sort of known since college but then I was in denial but then my therapist told me for the second time that she thinks I am and then my son got diagnosed, it’s a long story) as well as crazy (which I’ve accepted for years).

So anyway, I watched the trailer. I’m not excited.

Is it just me, or is every single autism story-line on TV exactly the same? Let’s see …

White male? Check.

Needs minimal supports? Check.

Played by non-autistic actor? Check.

Parents having trouble coping? Check.

Show has compulsive need to educate audience about stereotypical traits of autism? Check.

Seriously, folks. IT’S BORING.

Show me a female character who’s autistic. Show me an autistic character from a racial or ethnic minority. Show me an autistic character being raised by a single mom working low wage jobs, or a mom with a history of mental illness (which is statistically common since there’s a genetic link), or for that matter, a mom who’s single and working low wage jobs because she has a history of mental illness. Show me an autistic character who has comorbid conditions – epilepsy, OCD, intellectual disability, Tourette Syndrome, a vision impairment, a hearing impairment, impaired mobility, selective mutism, anything. Show me an autistic character who’s gay or bisexual or asexual or transgender or gender nonconforming. Show me an autistic character who challenges functioning labels. Show me a plot that isn’t all about the character’s social awkwardness.

Somebody needs to do for autism what Margarita with a Straw and Speechless have begun to do, in different ways, for cerebral palsy. It’s not about political correctness; it’s about reflecting reality.