Life, laminated

The most exciting thing that’s happened this week is that I came up with a new way to organize our growing collection of picture cards for Monkey’s visual supports. Ta da!

picture cards organizer 2

I had previously tried organizing them with paper clips or rubber bands, and sorting them in envelopes. They have velcro on the back, so they don’t stack nicely, and both of these methods, at their most functional, created too much clutter. I considered something like a binder but then I came up with this lovely system, which is more readily accessible and better suited to what we are using them for. The stickers can be easily peeled off to change categories as needed, and there’s plenty of room for more cards. Yay!

We first started using picture cards with Monkey about a year ago, maybe a little more than a year. He was around 18 months. We started with photographs of different foods that he would eat and a choice board. At the time, he had basically no speech that we could understand, so we used the board and pictures like a rudimentary PECS system that allowed him to tell us what he wanted to eat or drink.

Fast forward to now. Monkey is HIGHLY verbal, and we are steadily increasing our use of visual supports. But why is that needed, if he can talk?

It’s not – I just really enjoy laminating stuff.

Just kidding. Although Monkey can offer up such complete sentences as “I wasn’t exactly expecting to see a dragon in my backyard today”*, he often can’t answer the question of whether he wants milk or juice. He has a delay in processing other people’s language. If you offer him a picture of milk and a picture of juice, then he is able to process what his options are, make a choice, and tell you (or point to the picture, but he usually also says the word).

He is much better able to process visual information than auditory information. (His hearing has been tested and is great, by the way. He loves the sound of birds outside.) The more words you use and the more complicated what you are saying (eg. a sequence of steps or events, two-part commands), the less likely he is to understand. And since he has anxiety around transitions, we started using picture schedules shortly after his second birthday, to let him know what’s coming and what’s expected, and to give structure to his day.

Right now, there’s a corner of our living room that is basically a shrine to visual supports. In addition to my lovely organizer pictured above, there’s a daytime schedule and a bedtime routine schedule, both with velcro so we can change them. Then there’s an activity schedule for structured play-time, an activity choice board for unstructured play time, a first-then board (“first wash hands, then snack”), and I am in the process of making a very simple token board. I’m also considering making some cards to put on a key-ring and carry in the diaper bag – for instance, one that says we’re “leaving soon”.

The activity schedules are fairly new and it’s amazing how his play has changed already. The bedtime schedule has been particularly helpful with his anxiety about bath-time. He was getting hysterical every time we put him in the bath, to the point that we couldn’t wash him at all. Apparently, this was because he never knew if we were going to wash his hair or not. If I told him “We are NOT going to wash your hair,” he didn’t understand, especially since he was already upset. But now he knows that if the picture of a bathtub on his schedule is replaced with a picture of a kid having his hair washed, it’s Hair Washing Night. That takes out the element of uncertainty, and now he climbs happily into the tub himself.

Every time I add a new system like this, there’s a part of me that thinks “Aren’t you taking this therapy mom geekdom a bit far? Your son is smart and verbal, do you really need a gazillion laminated pictures to communicate with him?”

But the more we use the pictures, the more it’s clear that, yes, we do. His ability, or inability, to understand and process spoken language at a certain speed has nothing to do with how smart he is. He is a picture kind of guy, and I’m learning to embrace that.

Besides. Anything that makes my life feel more organized and manageable right now is very, very, very welcome.

 

*This is from a TV show and is called delayed echolalia.

Note- I use LessonPix.com to make my cards. It’s a great website, user friendly, allows you to use your own photos, and the pictures they provide are nice – definitely recommend.

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