How to lose a friend (when you have a child with special needs)

1) Start out with a baby with unexplained delays. Befriend a mom whose baby also has unexplained delays. Talk a lot about your babies and their delays.

2) Live in affordable housing, in an apartment that’s not big enough to put all your stuff away even on those days when you have the energy to try. Make your living space look like a disorganized hospital by lining up oxygen tanks in the entryway and hanging nasal cannulas off chairs.

3) Find ways for your child to be in the hospital a lot; it interferes with scheduling play dates, and also makes your friend feel obligated to care even after the novelty has worn off (like, really? the hospital again?). Ideally, this should start happening right around the time that your friend’s child is outgrowing her delays and needing fewer services. It also helps if you can get a few new, unexpected diagnoses during this period to stress over and talk about in detail.

4) Share hilarious anecdotes, like how you once splashed yourself in the face with your child’s lymph fluid while emptying Jackson-Pratt drains. (Also a great way to avoid making new friends, should you find yourself in a group of moms.)

5) Keep venting about therapists, doctors, DMEs, and your concerns about your child’s development, while your friend has nothing to say in that area because her child is basically typical now and this stuff is no longer a significant part of her life.

6) Try to convince yourself she’s not passive aggressively telling you something when she cancels play dates at the last minute “because she has to do laundry”, or leaves food on your doorstep after you get back from the hospital instead of coming in. Keep texting her to ask how she’s doing and if she wants to get together, even though you’re always the one initiating it. Let your suspicion and resentment simmer quietly.

7) Stop texting her for a while because you are completely overwhelmed with illness, ER visits, pediatrician visits, another sleep study, trying to get your child to tolerate a nebulizer (no really, it’s an octopus!), trying to figure out the whole process of transitioning from early intervention to preschool, and scheduling two different autism evaluations because the people from the first place stopped calling you back and still haven’t given you a date. Notice in some part of your subconscious that she hasn’t commented on any of your medical updates on Facebook, even when your son was in the ER on Christmas Eve.

8) Ask how she’s doing. When she doesn’t respond within ten minutes, ask if she’s ignoring you.

9) Get a lecture about how you haven’t been contacting her either, and how she’s been really busy with buying a house in an upscale neighborhood so her daughter can go to the best preschool.

10) Drawing on months of carefully controlled, slow-simmering resentment, say something sarcastic implying that your life is harder than hers. Be told that you’re a crap friend because all you talk about is your child’s medical issues and she doesn’t want to hear it.

11) Completely explode. Use profanity. Be as insulting and mean as you possibly can. It’ll feel good for about 10 seconds. Maybe a full minute. Make sure there’s no possible way she’ll ever want to hear from you again.

12) Take a benzo so you can settle the adrenalin enough to get some sleep, because you’re touring the special needs preschool in the morning. Feel guilty and analyze the reasons why you’re a horrible person.

13) Realize that you should have let the friendship die quietly months ago, and the main reason you didn’t was because it was your only shot at play dates for your socially challenged son.

14) Decide to do better next time.

Trust me, this works really well. I think it might actually be impossible to keep a friend if you faithfully follow all these steps. Good luck!

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