Caregiving. Is. Work.

Congressional Republicans, by considering legislation that would eliminate SSI benefits for disabled children, have given me an opportunity to write again about one of my pet issues: the devaluing of caregiving.

If the politicians responsible for this particular budget-saving strategy had any ability to be honest, they would say, “We are unapologetic human scum who have no problem taking assistance from children with cerebral palsy and autoimmune diseases and cancer and giving that money to our billionaire friends so they can buy a second island.”

Of course, they don’t say that. Instead, they write:

“One rationale for this option is that providing SSI benefits to children may discourage their parents from working. Unlike Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, a welfare program that aims to help families achieve self-sufficiency, SSI imposes no work requirements on parents and does not explicitly limit how long they may receive benefits as long as the child remains medically and financially eligible.”

Yeah. Because, you know, it’s not like taking care of a seriously disabled child is work. I mean, those parents might be doing a lot of stuff that would normally be done by nurses, and they might even be doing it 24/7 and be chronically sleep deprived and on the verge of a nervous breakdown, and there might be the life of another human being depending on what they do every fucking day and night, but that’s no excuse for not having a real job.

According to this page , which cites the SSI Annual Statistical Report from 2011 as its source, about 1/3 of single-parent households with a child on SSI have a working parent (i.e., the parent is working and raising the disabled child by themselves) and 2/3 of two-parent households have a working parent (i.e., one parent works and the other takes care of the child). And according to this SSA report from 2005,

“Most children receiving SSI lived in a family headed by a single mother, and less than one in three lived with both parents. A very high proportion, about half, were living in a household with at least one other individual reported to have had a disability.”

In other words, that 1/3 of two-parent families where neither parent works is actually 1) quite small, as most child SSI recipients live in single parent households, and 2) are mostly households in which one of the parents is also disabled and unable to work, leaving the other parent as the caregiver for the child and perhaps for the spouse as well.

Such lazy people. I mean, who spends all day every day taking care of their disabled child and spouse? What kind of excuse for existing is that? Get off the couch and get a real job!

My son, Monkey, who has multiple medical issues that affect things like eating and breathing and sleeping and who also has developmental delays, does not receive SSI benefits. We applied for him at one point and were denied; the requirements are quite stringent. The other parents I’ve met whose children received SSI were single mothers who worked full time or overtime. (But, you know, lazy.) Monkey does receive Medicaid, however, which has been extremely important for him and for our family. Which brings me to my next point.

The politicians again:

“Rather than provide a cash benefit to parents without ensuring that they spend the money on their disabled children, policymakers could choose to support those children in other ways. For example, states could receive grants to make an integrated suite of educational, medical, and social services available to disabled children and their families.”

The irony of this statement coming from the very same people who want to block grant Medicaid, reinstate lifetime limits, etc – taking medical care away from the disabled children they are talking about – and who support a nominee for Secretary of Education who has no idea what IDEA is, would be entertaining if it were not so sickening.

To these people, who preach from their offices about the value of work, who are so afraid they might discourage some low-income parent of a disabled child from working, I want to say something clearly: CAREGIVING IS WORK.

It is work when you’re taking care of a patient in a hospital.

It is work when you’re taking care of a patient in a nursing home.

It is work when you’re taking care of a disabled person in a group home.

It is work when you’re taking care of a disabled person in their own home.

It is work when you’re taking care of a disabled person in your home.

It is work when you’re taking care of an elderly person in their home.

It is work when you’re taking care of a child in their home.

It is work when you’re taking care of a child in your home.

It doesn’t matter whether the person being taken care of is related to you or not, whether you are being paid or not, or what kind of building you’re in. It’s the same work. Someone has to do it if our society is going to be anything worth living in, worth even calling a society. Wherever you are, whether you make money or not, if you are taking care of another human being who depends on you for that care, then you are working.

 

For more thoughts on the ways our society systematically devalues caregiving: Caregiving vs. Capitalism

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